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Chromophobia is marked, not just by the desire to eradicate color, but also to control and to master its forces. When we do use color, there’s some sense that it needs to be controlled; that there are rules to its use, either in terms of its quantity or its symbolic applications (e.g., don’t paint your dining room blue because it suppresses appetite). Please note that I’m not arguing against color psychology; it’s undeniable that certain colors carry certain cultural assumptions and associations, a fact that has led anthropologist Michael Taussig to argue that color should be considered a manifestation of the sacred. But what I am arguing is that there is a pervasive idea that color gets us in the gut: it’s seductive, emotional, compelling. Color, in the words of nineteenth-century art theorist Charles Blanc, often “turns the mind from its course, changes the sentiment, swallows the thought.”

According to some art critics, sensory anthropologists, and historians, this mutual attraction and repulsion to color has centuries-old roots, bound up in a colonial past and fears of the unknown. Michael Taussig has recounted that from the seventeenth century, the British East India Company centered much of its trade on brightly colored, cheap, and dye-fast cotton textiles imported from India. Because of the Calico Acts of 1700 and 1720, which supported the interests of the wool and silk weaving guilds, these textiles could only be imported into England with the proviso that they were destined for export again, generally to the English colonies in the Caribbean or Africa. These vibrant textiles played a key part in the African trade, and especially in the African slave trade, where British traders would use the textiles to purchase slaves. According to Michael Taussig, these trades are significant not only because they linked chromophilic areas like India and Africa, but also because “color achieved greater conquests than European-instigated violence during the preceding four centuries of the slave trade. The first European slavers, the Portuguese in the fifteenth century, quickly learned that to get slaves they had to trade for slaves with African chiefs and kings, not kidnap them, and they conducted this trade with colored fabrics in lieu of violence.” Ironically, many of these slaves were then put to work in the colonies cultivating plants like indigo, that yielded dyes whose monetary values sometimes surpassed that of sugar.

In England, contemporaries often called the Indian textiles “rags” or “trash” and scorned their bright colors, and in Europe more generally, bright colors were taken as a sign of degeneracy and inferiority. The German writer Goethe famously stated that “Men in a state of nature, uncivilized nations and children, have a great fondness for colors in their utmost brightness,” whereas “people of refinement” avoid vivid colors (or what he called “pathological colors”). In short, a love of bright color marked one as uncivilized, as not possessing taste, as being “foreign” or other. Color represented the “mythical savage state out of which civilization, the nobility of the human spirit, slowly, heroically, has lifted itself — but back into which it could always slide” (Batchelor, 23).

This danger of descent, of falling into degeneracy, disorientation, and excess, resulted in a valorization of the “generalized white” mentioned above. According to Batchelor, prejudice against color “masks a fear: a fear of contamination and corruption by something that is unknown or appears unknowable,” and the highly minimal, white spaces of contemporary architecture mark an attempt to rationalize and strictly limit an interior, to stop its merging with the world outside. The “hollow, whited chamber, scraped clean, cleared of any evidence of the grotesque embarrassments of an actual life. No smells, no noises, no colour; no changing from one state to another and the uncertainty that comes with it.”

Color, Chromophobia, and Colonialism: Some Historical Thoughts | Apartment Therapy 

All of this is not to say that if you love white and abhor the thought of a red, pink, or yellow room, that you are fearful of difference. Nor do these arguments even mean that you shouldn’t have an all-white home. What I think they do show us, though, is that some of our cultural preferences have deep-seated histories, associations, and legacies. The very idea of “good taste,” as opposed to the “garishness” and “tackiness” of colors that we say hurt our eyes or that we find offensive, draws on a deep well of cultural assumptions of what is “normal” or “refined.” Knowing this, I doubt that I will go paint my bedroom a vibrant red, but I very well may rethink my gut reactions to rooms that initially take me aback.

(via pbnpineapples)

Good read.

(via thegeekyblonde)
mikainarendelle:

Okay can we talk about how freaking awesome the difference between the way Mother Gothel treats Rapunzel, and the way Eugene does? It’s all in the body language. The first thing Mother Gothel does when she sees Rapunzel is check her hair. Eugene is always brushing it from her face. Mother Gothel is always kissing her hair, not Rapunzel. Eugene is always staring into her eyes. Eugene commissioned little girls to braid her hair to make it easier for her, and really liked how she looked free from it’s burden. Mother Gothel took out the braid at soon as she could. And lastly we can’t forget how Mother Gothel practically HUGS the hair, while Eugene’s last act was to cut it so she could live a normal life.
mikainarendelle:

Okay can we talk about how freaking awesome the difference between the way Mother Gothel treats Rapunzel, and the way Eugene does? It’s all in the body language. The first thing Mother Gothel does when she sees Rapunzel is check her hair. Eugene is always brushing it from her face. Mother Gothel is always kissing her hair, not Rapunzel. Eugene is always staring into her eyes. Eugene commissioned little girls to braid her hair to make it easier for her, and really liked how she looked free from it’s burden. Mother Gothel took out the braid at soon as she could. And lastly we can’t forget how Mother Gothel practically HUGS the hair, while Eugene’s last act was to cut it so she could live a normal life.
mikainarendelle:

Okay can we talk about how freaking awesome the difference between the way Mother Gothel treats Rapunzel, and the way Eugene does? It’s all in the body language. The first thing Mother Gothel does when she sees Rapunzel is check her hair. Eugene is always brushing it from her face. Mother Gothel is always kissing her hair, not Rapunzel. Eugene is always staring into her eyes. Eugene commissioned little girls to braid her hair to make it easier for her, and really liked how she looked free from it’s burden. Mother Gothel took out the braid at soon as she could. And lastly we can’t forget how Mother Gothel practically HUGS the hair, while Eugene’s last act was to cut it so she could live a normal life.
mikainarendelle:

Okay can we talk about how freaking awesome the difference between the way Mother Gothel treats Rapunzel, and the way Eugene does? It’s all in the body language. The first thing Mother Gothel does when she sees Rapunzel is check her hair. Eugene is always brushing it from her face. Mother Gothel is always kissing her hair, not Rapunzel. Eugene is always staring into her eyes. Eugene commissioned little girls to braid her hair to make it easier for her, and really liked how she looked free from it’s burden. Mother Gothel took out the braid at soon as she could. And lastly we can’t forget how Mother Gothel practically HUGS the hair, while Eugene’s last act was to cut it so she could live a normal life.
mikainarendelle:

Okay can we talk about how freaking awesome the difference between the way Mother Gothel treats Rapunzel, and the way Eugene does? It’s all in the body language. The first thing Mother Gothel does when she sees Rapunzel is check her hair. Eugene is always brushing it from her face. Mother Gothel is always kissing her hair, not Rapunzel. Eugene is always staring into her eyes. Eugene commissioned little girls to braid her hair to make it easier for her, and really liked how she looked free from it’s burden. Mother Gothel took out the braid at soon as she could. And lastly we can’t forget how Mother Gothel practically HUGS the hair, while Eugene’s last act was to cut it so she could live a normal life.
mikainarendelle:

Okay can we talk about how freaking awesome the difference between the way Mother Gothel treats Rapunzel, and the way Eugene does? It’s all in the body language. The first thing Mother Gothel does when she sees Rapunzel is check her hair. Eugene is always brushing it from her face. Mother Gothel is always kissing her hair, not Rapunzel. Eugene is always staring into her eyes. Eugene commissioned little girls to braid her hair to make it easier for her, and really liked how she looked free from it’s burden. Mother Gothel took out the braid at soon as she could. And lastly we can’t forget how Mother Gothel practically HUGS the hair, while Eugene’s last act was to cut it so she could live a normal life.
mikainarendelle:

Okay can we talk about how freaking awesome the difference between the way Mother Gothel treats Rapunzel, and the way Eugene does? It’s all in the body language. The first thing Mother Gothel does when she sees Rapunzel is check her hair. Eugene is always brushing it from her face. Mother Gothel is always kissing her hair, not Rapunzel. Eugene is always staring into her eyes. Eugene commissioned little girls to braid her hair to make it easier for her, and really liked how she looked free from it’s burden. Mother Gothel took out the braid at soon as she could. And lastly we can’t forget how Mother Gothel practically HUGS the hair, while Eugene’s last act was to cut it so she could live a normal life.
mikainarendelle:

Okay can we talk about how freaking awesome the difference between the way Mother Gothel treats Rapunzel, and the way Eugene does? It’s all in the body language. The first thing Mother Gothel does when she sees Rapunzel is check her hair. Eugene is always brushing it from her face. Mother Gothel is always kissing her hair, not Rapunzel. Eugene is always staring into her eyes. Eugene commissioned little girls to braid her hair to make it easier for her, and really liked how she looked free from it’s burden. Mother Gothel took out the braid at soon as she could. And lastly we can’t forget how Mother Gothel practically HUGS the hair, while Eugene’s last act was to cut it so she could live a normal life.
mikainarendelle:

Okay can we talk about how freaking awesome the difference between the way Mother Gothel treats Rapunzel, and the way Eugene does? It’s all in the body language. The first thing Mother Gothel does when she sees Rapunzel is check her hair. Eugene is always brushing it from her face. Mother Gothel is always kissing her hair, not Rapunzel. Eugene is always staring into her eyes. Eugene commissioned little girls to braid her hair to make it easier for her, and really liked how she looked free from it’s burden. Mother Gothel took out the braid at soon as she could. And lastly we can’t forget how Mother Gothel practically HUGS the hair, while Eugene’s last act was to cut it so she could live a normal life.
mikainarendelle:

Okay can we talk about how freaking awesome the difference between the way Mother Gothel treats Rapunzel, and the way Eugene does? It’s all in the body language. The first thing Mother Gothel does when she sees Rapunzel is check her hair. Eugene is always brushing it from her face. Mother Gothel is always kissing her hair, not Rapunzel. Eugene is always staring into her eyes. Eugene commissioned little girls to braid her hair to make it easier for her, and really liked how she looked free from it’s burden. Mother Gothel took out the braid at soon as she could. And lastly we can’t forget how Mother Gothel practically HUGS the hair, while Eugene’s last act was to cut it so she could live a normal life.

mikainarendelle:

Okay can we talk about how freaking awesome the difference between the way Mother Gothel treats Rapunzel, and the way Eugene does? It’s all in the body language. The first thing Mother Gothel does when she sees Rapunzel is check her hair. Eugene is always brushing it from her face. Mother Gothel is always kissing her hair, not Rapunzel. Eugene is always staring into her eyes. Eugene commissioned little girls to braid her hair to make it easier for her, and really liked how she looked free from it’s burden. Mother Gothel took out the braid at soon as she could. And lastly we can’t forget how Mother Gothel practically HUGS the hair, while Eugene’s last act was to cut it so she could live a normal life.

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